Pokémon Go fiasco costs festival organisers $1.575 million
Contract , Live Events / June 2018

CONTRACT Live events sector   The disastrous Fyre Festival, organised by entrepreneur Billy MacFarland, is one example of what happens when technology innovators believe the myth that it’s easy to organise a successful music festival. It’s not. The festival, held in April 2017, experienced a number of serious management, administration and organisational issues and was cancelled after guests had begun to arrive in the Bahamas – most of who had paid thousands of dollars to receive ‘VIP’ treatment. The festival was heavily promoted in the social media as ‘the cultural experience of the decade’ touting luxury villas and gourmet food, but instead, was a total failure.   MacFarland, who founded the online ad platform Spling, along with Magnises, which aimed to create an exclusive “black card” with social perks such as club membership, and Fyre Media with Ja Rule, is now facing various civil lawsuits and was arrested on charges of fraud and subsequently The 26-year-old business owner pleaded guilty to wire fraud charges in a Manhattan federal court in a deal with prosecutors that suggested he serve between eight and 10 years in prison. McFarland also admitted to lying to investors and falsifying documents in a bid to raise funds for the lavish…

Planned EU legislation for lighting efficiency could be ‘catastrophic’ for culture

HEALTH & SAFETY Live events sector   Venues and theatres have warned that new EU legislation will see their ‘lights going out’ after new legislation is introduced which will not provide any exemption for stage lighting and will make specialist lighting subject to the same environmental rules that govern lighting sold domestic and office use. The Artistic Director of the National Theatre, Rufus Norris, has estimated the restrictions on traditional and LED light bulbs due to be enforced by the 1st September 2020 could cost British Theatres £1.25 billion, with a disproportionate burden falling on smaller venues. The European Union (EU)’s proposed Ecodesign Working Plan 2016–2019 will require all new stage lighting, from traditional tungsten bulbs to the latest LED fixtures, to meet new efficiency targets, from which they are currently exempt. According to the UK’s Association of Lighting Designers (ALD), the new regulations will “dramatically impact all areas of entertainment lighting and all who work in this field”, with the impact on live shows “immediate and overwhelming”. The PSA has joined the fight and General Manager Andy Lenthall told IQ magazine  “Professional stage lighting has always been exempt from the labelling regime, [but] that’s about to change” adding “Tungsten, halogen and other…