LICENSING / TAXATION
Live events sector

 

The outgoing head of the Texas Music Office, Casey Monahan, has said that his successor should continue pushing for a bill similar to the move proposed in 2013 by then-Rep Mark Strama to lower taxes on bars and clubs that heavily feature live music. Strama’s bill was intended as a way to offer incentives for bar owners to feature live music. But it died because of concerns over its potential cost and how the new law would be administered. “The passage of that (bill) would be a huge boost to the live music economy in the state,” said Monahan, who confirmed earlier this week that he will replaced after 25 years of service. “Recorded music hasn’t really recovered since 2000 and we’ve got to do something to provide an incentive for people to hire live musicians, because that’s the only real way to earn an income now.” Monahan said as Austin grows that his successor and other stakeholders in the music industry have to stay vocal about their place in the local economy and cultural scene. “It’s so important for people in the industry to assert themselves in the public arena,” he said adding that there was a need to  “Constantly remind people of our right to have a seat at the table.” Many in Austin and beyond have expressed concern over the state Music Office which has an annual budget of $280,000.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/blog/creative/2015/01/exit-interview-axed-texas-music-office-director.html