IFPI continue actions against file swappers
Copyright , Internet , Record Labels / November 2006

COPYRIGHT Record labels, internet Legal actions against thousands of music file-sharers across the world have been announced as the recording industry stepped up its campaign to deter copyright theft and promote legitimate use of music on the internet. Over 8,000 new cases in 17 countries are being announced today, including the first ever cases against illegal file-sharing in the two biggest markets of South America and in Eastern Europe.   A total of more than 13,000 legal actions have now been taken outside the United States. Legal actions are being extended to Brazil, where more than one billion music tracks were illegally downloaded last year and a country where record company revenues have nearly halved since 2000. Mexico and Poland are also seeing actions for the first time – while a further 14 countries are launching fresh actions against illegal file-sharing.  Over 2,300 of people have already paid the price for illegally file-sharing copyrighted material, with average legal settlements of €2,420.   Many of those on the receiving end of legal action are parents whose children have been illegally file-sharing.  They are finding that in many countries they are liable for any activities third parties undertake using their internet connection.  In…

MOBILE PHONE RINGTONE PIRACY BOOMS IN ASIA

COPYRIGHT Record Labels, Music Publishers, Internet, Telecommunications The phenomenal growth of Asia’s mobile phone market has spawned widespread ringtone download piracy. Copyright owners are battling to claim royalties in Asia – a region which has long been problematical with widespread traditional forms of music piracy, such as the organised distribution of counterfeit and bootleg CDs and cassettes. The International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers have said that the problem is prevelant in most South-East Asia territories. Whilst territories such as Japan, Korea, Singapore and Malaysia have systems in place to govern ringtone copyright, and owners are compensated for use, ringtone downloads in countries like Thailand and Phillipines are almost entirely unlicensed with little legal revenue. The ringtone market is now big business (see Law Updates September 2003). In Japan, music publisher collection society JASRAC receives multi-million dollar royalties from ringtone operators. In Singapore, one of the biggest cellular phone markets in Asia (with an ownership rate of 80 per cent) ringtones cost about $S2 ($1.79) on average in the legitimate market. Whilst a number of favourite downloads are mainstream western artists such as Norah Jones and Britney Spears, Asian composers are also being hurt because local hits are…